Stories of Hope

Shovon, heart recipient

Shortly after Shovon was born, doctors discovered that something was wrong with his heart. Actually, they discovered that lots of things were wrong with this heart. Shovon had four defects in one heart chamber, which meant that only one side of his heart was functioning, and his heart cavity was on the right side of his chest instead of the left. By the age of 10, Shovon had undergone six heart surgeries and had a pacemaker. Because Shovon’s heart condition caused him to tire easily or become ill, he spent the majority of his life watching from the sidelines, unable to participate in many youth activities or play sports. The local paramedics had to visit his home so often that Shovon knew them by name. Despite the best efforts of Shovon’s doctors, he was told that he would most likely need a heart transplant by the time he turned 21.

story-of-hope-shovon

At the age of only 16, just one month into his sophomore year of high school, Shovon knew something was drastically wrong. He began sweating excessively, running out of breath easily and feeling even more tired than usual. A trip to the ER confirmed his family’s worst fears—Shovon’s heart muscle was failing, and he needed a new heart to live. Fortunately, Shovon did not have to wait long. Three weeks after being placed on the national organ transplant waiting list, the perfect match was donated, and Shovon got his new heart.

Shovon’s transplant has improved his health and changed his outlook on life. His newfound energy enabled him to finish high school and his experience has inspired him to give back. Shovon is an active member of his community, and he just completed his studies to become a paramedic. His donor made it possible for him to help those in need, just like the paramedics that he got to know so well as a child helped him. He honors the generosity of his donor by living each day to the fullest.

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